Tags » Vladimir Nabokov

Thoughts on "Pnin"

“Pnin is a professor of Russian at an American college who takes the wrong train to deliver a lecture in a language he cannot master. Pnin is a tireless lover who writes to his treacherous Liza: ‘A genius needs to keep so much in store, and thus cannot offer you the whole of himself as I do.’ Pnin is the focal point of subtle academic conspiracies he cannot begin to comprehend, yet he stages a factually party to end all faculty parties forever.” 355 more words

Books

red poppies or peonies

“For the big picnic on Ada’s twelfth birthday and Ida’s forty-second jour de fête, the child was permitted to wear her lolita (thus dubbed after the little Andalusian gipsy of that name in Osberg’s novel and pronounced, incidentally, with a Spanish “t,” not a thick English one), a rather long, but very airy and ample, black skirt, with red poppies or peonies, “deficient in botanical reality,” as she grandly expressed it, not yet knowing that reality and natural science are synonymous in the terms of this, and only this, dream.”

— Vladimir Nabokov, Ada

Literature

artists and morons

“Remembrance, embers and membranes of beauty make artists and morons lose all self-control.”

— Vladimir Nabokov, Ada

Literature

On "universality"

A sketchy, half-formed thought I mentioned yesterday has stayed with me since, and I’m going to attempt to flesh it out a bit.

Since Boyhood… 1,077 more words

Najlepše naslovnice Lolite

Famozni roman Vladimira Nabokova, Lolita, prvi put je štampan 1955. godine u Parizu. Od tada, roman je doživeo mnoga izdanja na različitim jezicima. Izdvojila sam nekoliko naslovnica koje sam smatrala najlepšom vizualizacijom reči koje pokrivaju.

Knjiga

adds its icy tang

“Van did not err in believing that Ada remained unaffected by Greg’s devotion. He now met him again with pleasure— the kind of pleasure, immoral in its very purity, which adds its icy tang to the friendly feelings a successful rival bears toward a thoroughly decent fellow.”

— Vladimir Nabokov, Ada

Literature