Tags » Shirley Jackson

One Minute Book Review: We Have Always Lived in the Castle by Shirley Jackson

I’ve always thought Shirley Jackson was underrated, but before standing up on that soapbox realized I’d only ever read her short stories (and not many of them) myself. 106 more words

Books

The Lottery and Other Stories

The Lottery, one of the most terrifying stories written in this century, created a sensation when it was first published in The New Yorker…

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Book Reviews

Writing Excuses - 10.9 - Reverse-Engineer a Story

Reverse engineering “The Lottery” by Shirley Jackson

Writing Excuses 10.9 had us figuring out how an author puts a story together. The assignment was to dissect a piece of media—novel, story, comic, movie, or TV show—to see what promises the author made and how (s)he fulfilled them. 1,735 more words

Writing

Reading Across Boundaries: How to Move Beyond Canonical Men

I have been busy recently, so not much time to write blogs – i.e. procrastinate. However, I’ve managed to keep up my reading habits and still get through a book per week. 980 more words

Literature

Art of Influence: Neil Smith on the unparalleled Shirley Jackson

Who doesn’t love a scary story? The late American author Shirley Jackson knew how to tell a terrifyingly good one. She’s best known for “The Lottery” (1948), the infamous short story in which townsfolk draw slips of paper to decide who’ll be stoned to death in the village square. 826 more words

Arts

Neil Smith's teen-centric Boo turns the afterworld on its head

Are you ready for a heaven that looks a lot like a late-1970s low-income public housing project?

Actually, the world of Neil Smith’s beguilingly original new novel Boo (Knopf Canada, 310 pages, $21)  isn’t really heaven proper. 965 more words

Entertainment

Creepy kids, lit babes, and how to write about your escape from a burning building: Monthly Roundup, April 2015

 

I kept meaning to post my April roundup, and now, embarrassingly, it’s the middle of May. So let me dust off my Goodreads history and see what I read last month. 1,310 more words