Tags » Restoration Theatre

Reflections upon Restoration Theatre

A recent trip to the National Theatre’s latest Restoration piece The Beaux’s Stratagem provoked a flurry of thought on the nature and power that Restoration Theatre can hold, even today. 910 more words

Well That's Just Dandy..... An Exploration of How the Introduction of Female Actresses on the Restoration Stage Changed the Perception of Gender

This is for those of you who enjoy a little bit of Restoration Frivolity…or just fancy men in lacy cuffs!

Good theatre is a reflection of the society it entertains but Restoration comedy is an interesting example of a theatre which is commonly mistaken for a frivolous hiccup between Renaissance and Neoclassical theatre. 3,048 more words

Plays

Herod and Mariamne (staging)

By Samuel Pordage (August 1673?; pub.1673)

The play was printed in 1673, two years into the Duke’s Company’s occupation of Dorset Garden, but the prologue printed with the play tells us it was “Spoken at the Theatre in Lincolns-Inn-Fields”, and that the play was “first writ, a dozen years agoe”.[1] Using evidence from the prologue the London Stage assigns this play to September 1671. 360 more words

Restoration Theatre

Juliana, or The Princess of Poland (staging)

By John Crown (June 1671; pub. 1671)

According to the Literature Online database only 15 plays first performed in the period 1660-1700 begin with a song, and this is the first. 916 more words

Restoration Theatre

The Town-Shifts, or The Suburb Justice (staging)

By Edward Revet (March 1671; pub. 1671)

Genest’s evaluation of Revet’s nostalgic (or simply old-fashioned) comedy is about right: “it has no particular fault, but the plot is slight, and the dialogue insipid”. 762 more words

Restoration Theatre

The Six Days' Adventure (staging)

By Edward Howard (March 1671; pub. 1671)

As with The Women’s Conquest, Howard provides little information about scenery or settings in this play. There are three vague scene headings (to 4.1, 4.2, & 5.1). 663 more words

Restoration Theatre