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Jan Rozner in B O D Y

Seven Days to the Funeral is a lightly fictionalized memoir left unfinished at the death of the Slovak journalist, critic and translator Ján Rozner, who had emigrated to Germany in 1976. 76 more words

Subfeature

Mechanisms of Totalitarianism in Kundera's "The Joke"

On the 1st of April 1929, the Czech Republic’s most recognized living writer, and author of the highly acclaimed novel, The Unbearable Lightness of Being… 750 more words

Literature

No surrender, no retreat

Seventy years after the liberation of Auschwitz, one of its survivors, Jiri Kosta, died last month at the age of 93. His life after the tortures of the Second World War was both typical of a survivor of the concentration camps as well as extraordinary. 756 more words

German

LA SEGUNDA PATRIA DE UNA GIMNASTA COMPROMETIDA: De cómo Vera Čáslavská unió la Primavera de Praga con los estudiantes de la Plaza de las Tres Culturas. México, 1968

¿Cuándo antes en la Historia del deporte moderno se había producido semejante conjunción entre una deportista y su país de adopción…? Es más, ¿cuántas estrellas del deporte, al mismo que fueron excepcionales en sus respectivas disciplinas, se comprometieron con alguna causa social y de forma pública? 1,043 more words

Gymnast

WALL WISDOM

“IF THESE WALLS COULD TALK”… WELL, SOMETIMES THEY CAN. AND DO.

“If these walls could talk,” people say when they find themselves at places where  55 more words

Global News

Good Night, Mr. Knightley



Toward the end of that summer Ross asked me to marry him. We had spent the spring and summer together more or less brilliantly, and he had simply turned to me one day in the car on the way home and asked matter-of-factly, “If I asked you to marry me, you’d say yes, wouldn’t you?” His sister was thrilled and started making plans, much to Ross’ amusement and my consternation. 1,449 more words

Fiction

Book Review: A Guide to Broken Roads, by Jaroslav Kalac (Eleusinian Press, 2014)

Jaroslav Kalac’s excellent novel is, as the author admits in the preface, half memoir and half fiction, and though ostensibly an autobiography of childhood intercut with fantastical short stories, it’s harder than you might expect to see where the joins lie. 977 more words

Book Review