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Literary Periods of British Literature

450-1066: Old English (or Anglo-Saxon) Period
1066-1500: Middle English Period
1500-1660: The Renaissance

  • 1558-1603: Elizabethan Age
  • 1603-1625: Jacobean Age
  • 1625-1649: Caroline Age
  • 1649-1660: Commonwealth Period (or Puritan Interregnum)
  • 1,852 more words
Literature

JEKYLL and HYDE

GOTHIC FANTASY or THOUGHT CRIME?

The duality and multiplicity of the Victorian era is implied in the reflectionism of Stevenson’s text. This includes the rise and fall of empire, the adoption of empirical science, the ascension of the middle class and the advent of the modern era; the list goes on and on. 572 more words

SHORT STORIES

THE MARX OF EMPIRE - DRACULA

Shakespeare’s “Macbeth” opens on the heath with the three wicked sisters and the immortal line “something wicked this ways comes.” Stoker borrows the idea in his portrayal of the three voluptuous women at Castle Dracula and without direct allusion allows his readers to conclude the same. 1,173 more words

SHORT STORIES

Initial "Dental" Impressions; Dracula

Dracula doesn’t just fit the Gothic genre but embodies the entire theme. Every trope available to the Gothic author is apparent within its first few chapters; a naïve young man journeys to a strange country at night in a darkened stagecoach to meet with an aristocrat who is feared and shunned by the local population and who just happens to live in a ruined castle in a darkened forest, filled with wolves and who is randomly disturbed by itinerant gypsies whilst trying to grab forty winks in his own crypt. 623 more words

SHORT STORIES

WUTHERING HEIGHTS - "ELEMENTARY GOTHIC MY DEAR WATSON"

“When the sublime is impossible Watson, then only the Gothic is possible”

      Bronte’s novel is everything one would expect from a Victorian Gothic; a third party fireside tail related by a servant who can only reveal that which she believes to be true. 1,331 more words

SHORT STORIES

THE SIGNALMAN - CHARLES DICKENS

THE ALLUSION OF GOTHIC JUXTAPOSED BY THE ALLEGORY OF MODERNITY

We’ve already established that the tropes of Gothic literature although easily recognizable are also very adaptable; whether a castle in the Rhineland or an old house on a windswept moor, the necessity of the setting is more psychological than it is physical.   546 more words

SHORT STORIES

VIVA LA CREATURE

An argument against feminist criticism in Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein

               Frankenstein is a novel of parallels and although Professor Mellor makes a convincing argument that the novel is an allusion to the repression of female sexuality and the negation and usurpation of nature, it is the anthropomorphism of nature as female that weakens her argument. 1,004 more words

English Studies