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those you lose

“‘The only women you can continue to love are those you lose.'”

— Joris-Karl Huysmans, La-bas

Literature

the contaminating curiosity of the crowd

“The rare artists who remain have no business to be thinking about the public. The artist lives and works far from the drawing-room, far from the clamour of the little fellows who fix up the custom-made literature. 27 more words

Literature

Too busy for music?!

I’ve neglected some of my favorite music sources including All Songs Considered, Sound Opinions, Soundcloud, new friends (for example, I’d never heard of Andy Shauf until I did my interview with… 80 more words

entitled itself capital

But it* reached its real height of monstrosity when, concealing its identity under an assumed name, it entitled itself capital. Then its action was not limited to individual incitation to theft and murder but extended to the entire human race. 27 more words

Literature

out-of-the-world pleasures

“From this scene he had learned an alarming lesson: that the flesh domineers the soul and refuses to admit any schism. The flesh decisively does not intend that one shall get along without it and indulge in out-of-the-world pleasures which it can partake only on condition that it keep quiet. 65 more words

Literature

the teeth of a wolf

“He found the woman at home and had a miserable time. She was a buxom brunette with festive eyes and the teeth of a wolf. An expert, she could, in a few seconds, drain one’s marrow, granulate the lungs, and demolish the loins.”

— Joris-Karl Huysmans, La-bas

Literature

the melancholy glose

“Durtal, amused, read on. Now du Moulin was debating with himself the point whether it was necessary to interdict abbés ravaged by lechery. And in answer he cited himself the melancholy glose of Canon Maximianus, who, in his Distinction 81, sighs, “It is commonly said that none ought to be deposed from his charge for fornication, in view of the fact that few can be found exempt from this vice.””

— Joris-Karl Huysmans, La-bas

Literature