Tags » Historical Collections

Another view of Waterloo

This guest post, written by Dr Jaap Harskamp (formerly Curator of Dutch & Flemish collections at the British Library, who is now working on the University Library’s early Dutch books) marks the anniversary of the Battle of Waterloo, in advance of the opening (on Friday 1 May) of the University Library’s exhibition on the subject. 954 more words

Historical Collections

Italian medieval and early Renaissance art

No matter how hard we try to be consistent in collecting, by following our collection policy, meeting the needs of the academic community and remaining abreast of current publications, we have to face the fact that there are inevitably gaps in our collections, gaps perhaps from previous decades, gaps which can be very hard to fill. 566 more words

Historical Collections

German art exhibition catalogues

Nowadays art exhibition catalogues are frequently very substantial items, rich in illustrative matter and with extensive introductory essays as well as detailed description and discussion of individual paintings. 641 more words

Historical Collections

Cambridge catalogues and librarians get a critical reception

The adventures of Baron Münchhausen, the German nobleman who had the habit of grossly exaggerating his experiences, have been reprinted many times and translated into a wide range of languages. 611 more words

Historical Collections

Love is all around

Saint Valentine’s Day, or the feast of Valentine, has its origins in the celebration of the life of Saint Valentine (Valentinius), a third century Roman saint. 726 more words

Historical Collections

The Skizzenbuch

The Skizzenbuch, a delightful early work by Franz Kugler (1808-1858), has recently been added to the University Library’s collections (8002.c.43). Franz Kugler is mainly known for his contributions to art history. 354 more words

Historical Collections

The Augsburg Confession in the Acton library

In 1530 one of the most important documents for the Lutheran Reformation was presented at the Diet of Augsburg: the Augsburg Confession. In an attempt to calm the tension surrounding the rise of Protestantism, Charles V had called upon the princes and rulers in the Holy Roman Empire to declare their religious convictions in order to settle the conflict. 861 more words

Historical Collections