Tags » François Truffaut

François Truffaut, Pedro Almodóvar & The Positive Portrayal of Women

Every filmmaker has a unique way of establishing his or her mark in the world of filmmaking. Through storytelling, camera work, or influence in a certain theme, filmmakers have brought stories to life since the pioneering days of Georges Méliès. 679 more words

Women's Empowerment

HISTORIA DEL CINE: PARTE CINCO

La Nueva Ola francesa
En ocasiones se ha escuchado en Ecuador una frase que busca desacreditar a la gente dedicada a la crítica y su intento por generar una mirada analítica sobre la obra que se produce en el país. 1,953 more words

Historia Del Cine

A Deadly Adoption (2015)

You have to put a lot of effort in if you want to get a perfect score in anything worthwhile, and the reverse is also true: if you want to score a pure 0%, you still have to work pretty damn hard. 826 more words

Film Review

Movie Reviews 06/21/15

Jules and Jim (dir. Francois Truffaut, 1962)

I usually shy away from tales of tragedy as I tend to unconsciously compare and mirror the hero’s futile attempts at life to that of my own or to ones I have yet to make so imagine my horror as halfway through Jules and Jim, what seemed to be a promising, humorous tale of friendship turned out to be a story of lost and waste. 1,014 more words

Movie Reviews

Shoot the Piano Player (1960)

Directed By – François Truffaut

Screenplay By – François Truffaut & Marcel Moussy

Cinematography By – Raoul Coutard

Starring Charles Aznavour & Marie Dubois

92 min. 39 more words

Drama

XL Popcorn - La Nuit Américaine

List Item: Watch all of the “1001 Movies You Must See Before You Die”
Progress: 429/1007Title: Day For Night (La Nuit Américaine)
Director: François Truffaut… 313 more words

Bucket List

Cannes Film Review: 'Hitchcock/Truffaut'

“In many of the films now being made, there is very little cinema: They are mostly what I call ‘photographs of people talking,’” Alfred Hitchcock told his awestruck French interlocutor, critic-cum-helmer Francois Truffaut, in the indispensable monograph whose 50th anniversary inspired film historian Kent Jones’ “Hitchcock/Truffaut.” The master of suspense referred to his own style, which tried to dispense with dialogue in favor of conveying a story through a sequence of shots, as “pure cinema,” and even though Jones’ documentary relies heavily on talking heads, recycled clips and traditional narration, there’s no question that it embodies pure cinema of a different sort — namely, a complete and total immersion in the medium, by way of a career-spanning appreciation of Hitchcock’s work, designed to echo and extend the impact of Truffaut’s seminal book. 752 more words

Reviews