Tags » David Graeber

Imagining a World Without Work

At the Chicago World’s Fair in 1893, someone asked American suffragette and political activist Mary Elizabeth Lease what she thought the world would be like in 100 years’ time. 2,641 more words

Buzz

„Das ist eine echte Revolution“. Interview von Pınar Öğünç mit David Graeber

AntiNote: Nachfolgend ein Interview mit David Graeber über seine Eindrücke aus Rojava. David Graeber schrieb als Professor für Anthropologie an der London School of Economics und Aktivist und Anarchist im Oktober 2014 einen Artikel in der Tageszeitung The Guardian, als der IS gerade begonnen hatte, Kobanê in Nordsyrien anzugreifen. 3,289 more words

Lingua Germanica

Games People Play

I attended a Virtual Human Resources Training Conference last week that was offered by the Office of Personnel Management. I don’t currently work as an HR specialist, but I am trying to stay as looped in as possible so that I can eventually find my way back into the HR fold. 311 more words

Culture

The Uncanny Valley of Regulation – Departing from Graeber’s Utopia of Rules

Anthropologist David Graeber has released a new book titled The Utopia of Rules, which is largely a collection of previous essays, loosely compiled around a favorite topic of ours here at Unfettered Equality:  bureaucracy. 1,217 more words

What We're Reading

Moments in the Culture

This post by (apparently) a professor at a British university highlights some of the aspects of Utopia of Rules that I found most striking. It also draws attention to a… 344 more words

Culture

Panphage/Pangenetor

In his book Apocalyptic Witchcraft, as well as his shorter essay Rewilding Witchcraft, one of Peter Grey’s central arguments is that contemporary paganism has been tamed by the standards of urbane bourgeois consumer society and the capitalist system that underlies it. 1,010 more words

Anarchism

The dead zones of the imagination in higher education

In his recent book on bureaucracy, David Graeber often turns to higher education to furnish examples of the broader tendency he describes. I thought this was a particularly vivid passage worth reproducing: 310 more words

Higher Education