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Memes and YouTube's Culture of Participation

Geoffrey V. Carter and Sarah J Arroyo’s article, “Tubing the Future: Participatory Pedagogy and YouTube U in 2020”, puts forward a host of ideas regarding the culture that is “inspired by online video sharing”.  529 more words

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YouTube: More than Just Memes?

In the article “Tubing the Future” by Geoffrey Carter and Sarah J. Arroyo, they focus their version of “participatory pedagogy” in 2020 by expanding on the ideas of memes taking over YouTube.   471 more words

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YouTube: Where a Single Video Can Lead to Thousands of Other Remixes

One of the most important aspects about online video sharing is the ability for its authors to create new content. In Geoffrey Carter and Sarah Arroyo’s article, … 474 more words

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The "Weird" Side of YouTube

The weird side of YouTube, it’s a place where a cat can become more famous than a celebrity and the mundane can turn viral. Although the word “weird” is conventionally used to describe something strange, it once meant “fate” in Shakespearean time. 495 more words

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Banging a Satanic President: Political Videos on YouTube as Part of Participatory Pedagogy

Very few videos on YouTube are made from scratch and therefor are “remixes” of other content. In their essay “Tubing the Future: Participatory Pedagogy and YouTube U in 2020”, Carter and Arroyo discuss YouTube videos as a part of participatory culture in which users recycle content in order to add their own ideas. 454 more words

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Memes: a cultural phenomenon

Memes as stated in Geoffrey Carter and Sarah Arroyo’s article Tubing the Future: Participatory Pedagogy and YouTube U in 2020, are an internet phenomenon in which ideas and behaviors are spread through a community that forms due to said meme.  495 more words

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