1. Meg Guliford on being a black grad student right now: “I’m disappointed with and disheartened by the institutional expectation that pressing forward with little interruption while trying to process all this heartbreak is healthy.”

    Academia
  2. Drivers wave a 2,000 rupiah note (about 13 cents) out the window, and the self-appointed guard wades out into the busy road, arms outstretched. He uses the implicit threat of his own mortality to bring the flow of traffic to a stop and allows the munificent driver to pass.

    Landscape
  3. Years ago I trained to be a doula for the dying, a companion for those in the last stages of life, visiting an hour or so a week or a day. That did not prepare me for living with someone who tells me regularly she only has two weeks to live.  

    Family
  4. “Everyone around you . . . they’re all experiencing the collateral damage of living. They are all grieving someone, missing someone, worried about someone.”

    Death
  5. “Perhaps one of the strangest sensations I’ve encountered, poised on the brink of motherhood, is the fact that even though I am reading copiously about babies and parenthood, I don’t know anything more than I did before.”

    Commentary
  6. “…when a piece of knitted or woven cloth…unravels, it separates into a single thread. Perhaps that’s an easier way to look at this process…not as a falling apart, but as a paring down, a reduction to a single, unbound thread, from which to weave again.”

    Personal Musings
  7. Sejal A. Shah on neurodiversity: “They say creativity arises in part from brain chemistry. Living with manic depressive illness has shaped me, created the contours of my adult life. I don’t tell everyone, but I am telling more.”

    Essay
  8. “…Larry grabbed me and asked if I would be writing about him. I told him I could if he wanted me to, but only if he wanted me to. Tears suddenly sprang to his eyes and he said, “As long as you make it beautiful. Because it was. The whole thing. Even the hard parts.”

    Death
  9. “In a real way, the trauma wiped the slate clean for me mentally. And that’s when I started the process of teaching myself to take myself seriously. By extension, I could start to take other black women seriously.” –Dr. Tressie McMillan Cottom

    Interviews
  10. “I know so many of them are fighting very hard to be heard. I hope they keep fighting. I hope they never give up. I believe there will be a day when all girls have the same freedom that I have. I just hope that day comes soon.”

    Inspiration