Writing / Posts Filter
  1. Letting Go of Perfection and Growing Multiple Skills to Enrich Creativity

    “When people tell me they think they should be blogging and posting on social media, but they don’t have anything to share, I recommend creating daily or weekly challenges for themselves.” On the Own Your Content site, Jen Hewett share insights on the creative process.

    Design
  2. How to Make a Proper Introduction for a Collaboration

    At Own Your Content, you’ll find advice from influencers across various topics. This toolkit offers tips from Grace Bonney, founder of Design*Sponge, and others on how to craft thoughtful emails that can lead to creative collaborations.

    Business
  3. The Radical Notion of Not Letting Work Define You

    “Just because something can’t be a career doesn’t have to mean that it can’t be part of your life and identity.” At Man Repeller, Molly Conway muses on imposter syndrome, work and identity, and being a playwright.

    Identity
  4. The sentences that make the stories

    At Nieman Storyboard, Jacqui Banaszynski highlights great sentences from two books, including Tommy Orange’s There There: From the dancing came the dancing. She writes: “It is lovely all on its own, as an arrangement of a few words between punctuation and white space. It is musical, especially when read aloud.”

    Authors
  5. To The Class of 2019

    Hilde Lysiak, the 12-year-old writer and publisher of the Orange Street News and one of the people on our 2019 “Anything is Possible” list, shares hard-won journalism advice in a commencement speech to the graduating class of the Reed School of Media.

    Journalism
  6. Marginalia

    Read “Marginalia,” creative nonfiction by Naomi Washer in 76 small parts: “7. The stories we tell ourselves when we are very young cannot be undone.”

    Art
  7. For the Record

    At Columbia Journalism Review, 18 journalists share how — or whether — they use tape recorders during interviews.

    Authors
  8. Teachers & Writers Magazine

    Teachers & Writers Magazine is a resource for teaching the art of writing in kindergarten through college and in non-classroom settings. Its mission is to “educate the imagination.”

    Academia
  9. Thirteen Thoughts On Writing

    Paul Skenazy on writing, on the Brevity blog: “Defend your story; don’t give up on it. At the same time, accept that you actually don’t know what the story is that you can tell. It’s likely that what you thought is your story is not your story but a way to discover your story.”

    Authors
  10. Dani Shapiro on her new memoir, DNA, and more

    “Hundreds of thousands of people are discovering that they didn’t know significant aspects of their own identities.” On her blog, Leslie Lindsay interviews author Dani Shapiro about her memoir Inheritance.

    Authors
  11. I Didn’t Realize that I Could Be a Voice for a Population of People

    “All I’ve wanted from the beginning is just to put a human face on poverty that is not the one that we think of…” Stephanie Land, who wrote a memoir on working as a maid and being a single mother, first found an audience on her blog.

    Authors
  12. ‘If I was waiting for confidence to write, I’d still be waiting’

    Online mag gal-dem sits down with writer and cultural critic Roxane Gay: “Bodies rarely follow rules. We all live in bodies that are complicated, and we should create space for that unruliness instead of always trying to discipline it.”

    Authors
  13. The 21st Century Is Old Enough To Legally Drink

    “I’ve never taken coke or, to my knowledge, had a helicopter doing surveillance on me. Yet, merely because I watched Goodfellas at an impressionable age, and several times since, every time I see a helicopter I feel like I’m on coke and the helicopter is doing surveillance on me.”

    Personal Musings
  14. My Year of Writing Anonymously

    “I found that when students wrote without their names, much that was awkward, dull, strained, and frankly boring fell away. It was like watching people who thought they couldn’t dance dancing beautifully in the dark.” Stacey D’Erasmo describes the freedom of writing, minus the byline.

    Authors
  15. Don’t Be Like Me: Take the Help, Dummy

    “Soon enough—a few weeks, a few months—and the poem seems to me like a cardboard cutout of a puppy: inauthentic, inflexible, lacking in depth or life. I don’t know why this is, but I hate it.” At The Gloria Sirens, Katie Riegel encourages other poets to be humble and willing to accept help.

    Inspiration