Feminism / Posts Filter
  1. Lorene Scafaria’s ‘Hustlers’ and the Anatomy of the Scam

    “These archetypes give women the extremely confused message that to be truly independent, ambitious, and empowered — and dare we say, feminist — is to perform well in the marketplace of the likeable self. It also gives capitalism, which is superficially unfashionable, a second life: its mercenary logic can take on a socially conscientious sheen.”

    Feminism
  2. Cut From the Same Cloth

    “For all I say I’m envious of my daughter’s freedoms, perhaps the older woman has more leeway, more agency.” Artist Myfanwy Tristram was irritated by her teenage daughter’s extreme fashions — until she took an illustrated journey into their origins.

    Art
  3. Entre Nous: Tressie McMillan-Cottom

    In Barb magazine, founder Marcelle Karp has a wide-ranging conversation with author and professor Tressie McMillan Cottom, on the South, black feminism, being a little petty, and much more.

    Authors
  4. ‘If I was waiting for confidence to write, I’d still be waiting’

    Online mag gal-dem sits down with writer and cultural critic Roxane Gay: “Bodies rarely follow rules. We all live in bodies that are complicated, and we should create space for that unruliness instead of always trying to discipline it.”

    Authors
  5. I Want to Make Sure It Stays What It Is: A Kind, Safe Space

    “It’s very intimidating, and it’s predominantly men in the business, even though you’re starting to see a lot more women in breweries.” Kate Christensen couldn’t find an online space to connect with other women who like craft beer — so she created one: Beer&Body Craft Beer Girls.

    Business
  6. The Problem with “Pretty Girls” and Princesses

    “Our world focuses on the looks of girls and the accomplishments of boys.” At OTV Magazine, Angela Noel reflects on the gendered compliments adults give children, and how they make it hard for girls to separate their self-worth from their appearance.

    Commentary
  7. On Boy Books and Girl Books

    “Can we all agree that there is no such thing as a girl or a boy book?” Teacher and parent Pernille Ripp writes on the toxic effects of defining books by the gender of their supposed audience.

    Books
  8. What Does One Word Matter? Doctoral Women on Twitter.

    Medievalist Lucy Allen writes on the recent move among women in academia to add the title “Dr” to their Twitter name, which she views as “an act of faith, a promise to myself to keep my work from being erased.”

    Academia
    Image by Caitriana Nicholson (CC BY 2.0)
  9. On Fear

    Writer and political organizer Alex Press on fear: “It’s hard to imagine such a state of mind, writing from the present. Ours feels like a time of fear, defined by it much as I was then defined by its absence.”

    Abuse
  10. “Vibrator Nation” by Lynn Comella

    A Q&A with the Vibrator Nation author: “They led with sex education not titillation, and worked to advance a social mission that included putting a vibrator on the bedside table of every woman, everywhere, because they believed that access to accurate sexual information and quality products had the potential to make everyone’s lives better.”

    Academia
    Photo by Krystal Ramirez
  11. Wonder Woman and Boogeymen

    Elizabeth cried watching Wonder Woman. Why? “I can’t remember the last time I saw a movie where a woman character kicked ass and all of us didn’t have to pay the price for that by first watching at least one woman be violently dehumanized before us.”

    Essay
    JD Hancock (CC BY 2.0)
  12. How Responsible Tourism Can Challenge Patriarchy in India

    At The Shooting Star, travel writer Shivya Nath writes on the positive social effects of responsible, sustainable tourism.

    Culture
  13. White Women In Robes 

    “White women in robes are marching in the streets again, and they are still leaving people of color behind.” Sherronda J. Brown discusses how eugenics, reproductive rights, white feminism, and white supremacy are historically and intricately connected.

    Commentary
  14. I Don’t Accommodate Uncontrolled Men

    “I don’t have any sympathy for men who can’t handle a woman with cleavage.” At Ezer, Bailey Steger writes a critique of purity culture from an egalitarian Christian perspective.

    Commentary
  15. Seriously, the Guy Has a Point

    Greg Fallis writes about Fearless Girl and Charging Bull — the two sculptures staring each other down in Lower Manhattan — and about the difficulty of engaging others in nuanced arguments.

    Art
    Image by Anthony Quintano (CC BY 2.0)